A HISTORY OF THE 65TH ARTILLERY

Upon America’s entry into the conflict in Europe during WW1, the need for artillery units to support our troops became apparent. In response, the Adjutant General of the Army ordered the organization of 6 new Coast Artillery Regiments to go to Europe as part of the American Expeditionary Force. These regiments were the 54th, 55th, 56th, 59th, 60th and 65th Coast Artillery.

1917 - December 15 - Orders were issued to the Commanding Officer, Northern Pacific Coast Artillery District in Seattle, Washington to organize the 65th Coast Artillery Regiment. All commissioned officers for the unit would be appointed by the Adjutant Generals Office and all enlisted men were to be drawn from the following sources:

1. HQ & F Battery would come from the Coast Defenses of Puget Sound

2. Batteries C, D, E & Supply Company would come from Columbia River Defenses headquartered in Fort Stevens, Oregon.

3. Enlisted men for HQ & D Battery would come from regular Coast Artillery Regiments.

4. Enlisted men for Supply Company and C, E and F Batteries would come from National Guard Coast Artillery

5. Batteries A & B would come from the Coast Defenses of San Diego both regular Coast Artillery as well as California National Guard units.

1918 - February 28 - The units having been organized and equipment issued, all men and equipment from the three defenses converged at Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco. All men were given a physical examination and then boarded the steamer Northern Pacific for the long trip to the East Coast.

1918 - March 2 - The Northern Pacific sailed out of San Francisco and the unit began it’s long journey to New York by way of the Panama Canal.

1918 - March 9 - The Northern Pacific took on oil at Colon, Panama Canal Zone and then continued it’s journey.

1918 - March 16 - The Northern Pacific arrived in New York and berthed at Hoboken, NJ, the men disembarked and boarded trains for Camp Merrit, NJ.

1918 - March 23 - The men were taken first by train then by ferryboat to the Cunard Line pier where they boarded the H.M.S. Mauritania.

1918 - March 25 - The Mauritania sailed for Europe carrying the men of the 65th Coast Artillery Regiment from the forts of the Pacific coast. Also on board was the 55th Regiment of coast Artillery drawn from the forts in the Boston area. There were also 200 Red Cross nurses on board.

1918 - April 1 - The H.M.S. Mauritania sailed into Liverpool, England and docked.

1918 - April 2 - Both regiments disembarked and were marched to the railway station. By 6 PM the unit had arrived at their destination, Romsey, England.

1918 - April 5 - The men were marched to the docks at Southampton and boarded a steamer to cross the English Channel.

1918 - April 6 - The steamer docks at LeHavre, France. The various “companies” had now been renamed “battalions” and went to several cities for training on the English 9.2 in guns they would be using. Rather than using trucks, this type of gun was drawn by a caterpillar type tractor.

After the training, the Regiment was split into 3 Battalions. They would be in continuous action for the next 70 days. The Regiment suffered a total of 3 men killed in action and 99 wounded as a result of a gas attack on a rear (R&R) area in Verdun.

1918 - December 27 - The Armistice has been signed, the 65th Regiment re-groups and masses at the port city of Brest, France for the trip home.

1919 - January 14 - The 65th Regiment boards the S.S. Haverford for the trans-Atlantic trip to the US.

1919 - January 30 - The SS Haverford docks in Philadelphia and the men are taken by train to Camp Dix, New Jersey.

The following article appeared in the New York Times, January 30, 1919, page 4.


                          2,197 LAND AT PHILADELPHIA


THE HAVERFORD BRINGS BACK MANY NEW YORKERS, INCLUDING JAY GOULD.

PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 30 -- Philadelpia today extended a hearty welcome to 2,197 men of the American Expeditionary Force, first of the overseas contingent to arrive at this port. They came on the liner Haverford. After being entertained at luncheon by women of the various war organizations, the veterans marched to the Pennsylvania Station and entrained for Camp Dix.

Most of the returning soldiers were members of the 65th Regiment, Coast Artillery. In addition, there were 138 colored casuals from nearly every American division that fought in France, thirty-seven officer casuals, and nine naval officers. Nearly all of the casuals were wounded. Among the Navy men were Ensign Jay Gould of New York, who had been stationed at Murmansk, Russia and Lieutenant Neilson Pee of Baltimore, once a Princeton football star.

The 65th Regiment is composed mainly of men from Washington, Oregon and California. Colonel Benjamin H. Kerfoot of Kansas, a veteran of the Philippines, is in command.

The regiment claims the honor of being the only organization of American troops to fire the British: 9.2-inch howitzer in action, and is said to have handled the heaviest mobile armament outside of the railroad mounted guns used by the American First Army. The regiment fired 15,000 tons of steel and explosives at five different points in the German line of defenses, all within a period of seventy days and nights. During this time, Colonel Kerfoot said, the casualties amounted to only three men killed and ninety-nine wounded in action. His records show that since the regiment’s inception, there had not been a court-martial of either an officer or enlisted man.

The following article appeared in the New York Times on March 25, 1919 on page 10.


                        COMPLAIN OF TROOP ACTS


CHARGES OF MALICIOUS MISCHIEF IN FRANCE DELAY DEMOBILIZATION


WASHINGTON. - March 24. - Delays in the demobilization at Camp Eustis, VA., of some units of the 65th Coast Artillery Regiment recently returned from France, has been due, it was learned today at the War Department, to investigations of complaints made by the owners of buildings in which these companies were quartered while in France.

Following the departure of the regiment for the United States, it was reported that serious cases of malicious mischief had been discovered at these quarters, and also that valuable oil paintings were missing. General Pershing asked that the companies involved be held in service until an investigation could be made. Subsequently the demobilization of the entire regiment was ordered but it is understood that the responsible officers are to be held in the service until the entire matter is cleared up.

The 3rd Battalion was taken by train to San Diego where the men were discharged

The 1st and 2nd Battalions were taken by train to Camp Lewis, Washington where they were discharged.

Units of the 65th Artillery participated in campaigns in St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne and Lorraine in 1918.

1919 - 28 February - The unit was demobilized at Camp Lewis, Washington.

1924 - 1 July - The Regiment is reconstituted in the Regular Army as the 65th Coast Artillery and organized (less the 3rd Battalion) in the Canal Zone.

The following article appeared in the Coast Artillery Journal, vol. 64, February 1926, page 197.


                         65th C. A. Antiaircraft Record


Battery B of the 65th Coast Artillery, stationed at Fort Amador, Canal Zone, established a record on November 27, 1925, by bringing down a towed sleeve target with the first round fired by the battery for the day. The target was being towed by a Martin bomber at a distance of 4,500 yards above the canal at the Culebra Island battery when the No. 4 gun, a 3-inch AA gun, model 1917, on a railroad mount, was given the command to fire one round. The gun responded, and coincident with the shot the sleeve was seen to be falling into the canal, the observing plane having reported a hit on the target. The next firing took place on December 1, 1925. This time the target was shot down after the fourth burst from all guns, which, although not as good as getting the target on the first shot, is considered also good shooting for this type of artillery.

This is the first time on record that a sleeve target has been brought down on with the first shot and, although remarkable in itself, shows the accuracy and effectiveness with which antiaircraft fire can be delivered by a well-trained section.

1926 - 31 July - 3rd Battalion activated at Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.

The following article appeared in the New York Times, December 2, 1928, page 24.


                    CANAL UNIT WINS TARGET TROPHY

WASHINGTON, December 1 (AP) - Award of the Knox trophy for best gunnery and target shooting during 1928 was made today to Battery “C”, 65th Coast Artillery, now a part of the anti-aircraft defense of the Panama Canal. Captain B. L. Milburn has been ordered from Panama to Boston to receive the trophy from the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the Revolution at their annual dinner.

1932 - 15 April - 65th Coast Artillery inactivated at Fort Amador, Canal zone.

1938 - 11 June - Activated at Fort Winfield Scott, California less 2nd and 3rd battalions. Fort Winfield Scott is located at the south approach of the Golden Gate Bridge and includes all seacoast artillery emplacements along Baker Beach to the west.

1939 - 11 October - 2nd Battalion activated at Fort Winfield Scott, California.

1939 - 12 October - 2nd Battalion assigned to Fort Barry, California. Fort Barry is located on the north side of the Golden Gate Bridge in the Marin County Headlands across the water from Fort Winfild Scott and Baker Beach. Note: see 2nd Battalion history below.

1940 - August 8 - Members of the 65th Artillery, being primarily anti aircraft gunners, made a significant historical contribution to their mission by developing the pedestal on which 50 caliber machine guns are mounted on Jeeps and other mobile vehicles as evidenced by this New York Times article which was printed on page 3 of the August 9, 1940 edition.


                              GUN MOUNT FOR AUTOS


               Anti-Aircraft Device is contrived on West Coast


CHEHALIS, Wash., Aug. 8 (AP) - Development of a new anti-aircraft machine gun mount, costing only $9.80, which might revolutionize defense tactics, was disclosed today by the Army during maneuvers in Southwest Washington. The device permits the mounting of 50-caliber anti-aircraft machine guns on any type of truck, making it possible to commandeer whole fleets of commercial vehicles at a moments notice and send them over the countryside to fire at planes

The mount was developed by the 65th Coast Artillery Regiment of San Francisco. Major R. C. Jones, Commanding the Second Battalion, said:

“We stole the four-foot-square steel plate, which constitutes the base and the rest of the material came out of the junk pile. The mount can be used in any ordinary commercial vehicle. This would make it tremendously useful if enough guns were available, as the larger the fleet of anti-aircraft trucks, the harder it would be for attacking planes to hit their target.”

1941 - January 6 - All units of the 65th Coast Artillery depart the San Francisco area and go south to the Anti Aircraft Artillery Training Center in Riverside, California for additional training.

1941 - 6 July - Advance elements of the 65th Artillery arrive in Fort Greely, Alaska.

1941 - 17 July - A Searchlight Platoon of the 65th Artillery arrives in fort Greely.

1941 - 3 August - All elements of the 65th Artillery in Alaska are relocated from Fort Greely to Fort Richardson, Alaska

1942 - 15 June - 3rd Battalion activated at Inglewood, California.

1943 - 10 May - 65th Coast Artillery Regiment is broken up and it’s elements are Reorganized and Redesignated as follows:

HHB as HHB, 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Group.

1st Battalion as the 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

Batteries “B”, “C” and “D”.

2nd Battalion as the 255th AntiAircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Gun Battalion.

3rd Battalion as the 245th AntiAircraft Artillery Searchlight Battalion.

1944 - 29 February - HHB 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Group inactivated.

1944 - 26 October - HHB 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Group Disbanded.

65th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battalion in Alaska:

Battery “B”

1943 - 12 July - Departed San Francisco

1943 - 22 July - Arrived in Alaska

1943 - 30 August - Stationed at Kiska, Aleutian Islands

1944 - 6 May - Depart Kiska Island

1944 - 23 June - Arrive Shemya Island

1944 - 18 August - Reorganized as a type “A” unit.

1945 - 1 May - Redesignated 427th AAA Gun Battery

1945 - 4 December - Inactivated at Fort Lawton, Washington (Seattle).

Battery “C”

1943 - 12 July - Departed San Francisco

1943 - 22 July - Arrived in Alaska

1943 - 30 August - Stationed at Kiska, Aleutian Islands

1944 - 6 May - Depart Kiska Island

1944 - 23 June - Arrive Shemya Island

1944 - 18 August - Reorganized as a type “A” unit.

1945 - 1 May - Redesignated 428th AAA Gun Battery

1945 - 1 November - Redesignated 428th AMTB HD Battery

(Anti Motor Torpedo Boat - Harbor Defense)

1946 - 20 June - Reorganized and Redesignated as 428th AAA Gun Btry.

1947 - 5 January - 428th AAA Gun Battery Inactivated.

Battery “D”

1943 - 12 July - Departed San Francisco

1943 - 22 July - Arrived in Alaska

1943 - 30 August - Battery “D” stationed at Kiska, Aleutian Islands

1943 - 25 December - Departed Kiska, Aleutian Islands

1943 - 31 December - Arrived Fort Greely, Alaska

1944 - 21 June - Departed Fort Greely, Alaska

1944 - 24 June - Arrived Adak, Aleutian Islands

1944 - 18 August - Reorganized as a type “A” unit.

1945 - 1 May - Redesignated 429th AAA Gun Battery.

1945 - 30 November - Inactivated at Fort Lewis, Washington.

1946 - 18 December - Reconstituted in the Regular Army.

255th AntiAircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion

Consisted of Batteries “A”, “B” and “C”.

1943 - 10 May - 2nd Bn / 65th AA Redesignated 255th AAA AW Bn

1943 - 22 July - Arrived Alaska

1943 - 15 August - Arrived on Kiska Island.

1944 - 4 April - Relocated to Adak Island.

1944 - 22 November - Relocated to Attu Island.

1945 - 3 February - Disbanded at Camp Earle, Attu Island, Alaska.

Consisted of HQ & HQ Battery as well as Battery “I”

See Detachment 12 and 16 histories below.

1947 - 15 January - HHB 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Group activated at Fort Amador, Canal Zone.

1957 - 27 December - Inactivated at Fort Clayton, Canal Zone.

1945 - 26 January - 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battalion inactivated at Camp Hood, Texas less batteries B, C & D.

1945 - 1 May - Batteries B, C & D Redesignated as follows:

Battery B - 427th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery : see below

Battery C - 428th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery : see below

Battery D - 429th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battery : see below

1949 - 1 May - 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battalion activated on Okinawa with new batteries B, C & D.

1958 - 1 September - 65th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battalion inactivated in Japan.

427th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery : After Alaska

1946 - 3 October - Redesignated 427th AntiAircraft Artillery Searchlight Battery.

1946 - 1 November - Activated at Camp Hood, Texas.

1948 - 27 December - Inactivated at Camp Hood, Texas

1954 - 2 December - Redesignated as the 427th Airborne AntiAircraft Artillery Battery.

1955 - 1 January - Activated at Camp Campbell, Kentucky.

Attached to 508th Airborne Regimental Combat Team

1957 - 22 March - Inactivated at Camp Campbell, Kentucky.

428th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery: After Alaska

1945 - 1 November - Reorganized and Redesignated as the 428th Coast Artillery Battery - AMTB (Anti Motor Torpedo Boat)

1946 - 9 November - Reorganized and Redesignated as the 428th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery.

1947 - 5 January - Inactivated at Adak, Alaska.

1953 - 6 May - Redesignated as the 428th AntiAircraft Artillery Battery.

1953 - 8 June - Activated at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1953 - 27 August - Arrive at Thule, Greenland - Attached to 549th AAA

1958 - 15 May - Inactivated at Thule Greenland.

429th AntiAircraft Artillery Gun Battery: After Alaska

1945 - 30 November - Inactivated at Fort Lewis, Washington.

1953 - 6 May - Redesignated as the 429th AntiAircraft Artillery Battery.

1953 - 8 June - Activated at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1953 - 27 August - Arrive a Thule, Greenland - Attached to 549th AAA Bn

1958 - 15 May - Inactivated at Thule, Greenland

1950 - July - The Army formed it’s Army Antiaircraft Command known as (ARAACOM)

1957 - March 27 - The Army Antiaircraft Artillery Command (ARAACOM) changed it’s name to the US Army Air Defense Command  (USARADCOM)

1961 - May 1 - The Army adopts a simplified acronym ARADCOM

1974 - October 1 - The last vestige of an operational capability by ARADCOM was relinquished upon the transfer of the 31st ADA Brigade to the United States Army Forces Command (FORSCOM)

1st Battalion, 65th Artillery becomes part of 11th ADA Brigade.

The late 50’s to late 70’s was the most active period for the 65th Artillery with the following activity:

1st Battalion, 65th Artillery
1959 to 1970 - Nike Hercules in Okinawa
1972 to 1978 - Hawk ARADCOM Key West
1979 to 1987 - Hawk 11th ADA Brigade, Fort Bliss

2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery
1958 to 1960 - Nike Ajax and Hercules ARADCOM New York
1971 to 1974 - Nike Hercules ARADCOM Van Nuys, California

3rd Battalion, 65th Artillery
1958 - 1971 - Nike Ajax and Hercules ARADCOM Detroit / Cleveland

4th Battalion, 65th Artillery
1958 - 1972 - Nike Hercules ARADCOM Los Angeles

6th Battalion, 65th Artillery
1962 - 1972 - Hawk ARADCOM Key West

7th Battalion (“G” Battery), 65th Artillery
1966 - 1971 - Quad 50’s Republic of Viet Nam

1st Battalion, 65th Artillery

1901 - 14 August -Constituted in the Regular Army as the 116th Company, Coast Artillery, Artillery Corps.

1901 - 17 August - Organized at Fort Screvin, Georgia (Savannah / Tybee Island)

1907 - 2 February - Redesignated as the 116th Co. CAC.

1916 - July - Redesignated as the 4th Co., Fort Grant (Canal Zone).

1917 - 31 August - Redesignated as the 4th Co., Coast defenses of Balboa.

1922 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 116th Co. CAC.

1924 - 1 July - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “A”, 65th Coast Artillery.

HQ, A & B Btry - Coastal Defense of Balboa, HQ at Fort Amador, CZ

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General

1930 - April - The 1st Battalion of the 65th CA (AA) Regiment (HHB and Batteries A and B) were posted at Fort Amador while the 2nd Battalion was posted at Fort Randolph with Battery C at Fort Randolph and Battery D at Fort Sherman across the Canal.

1932 - 15 April - Inactivated at Fort Amador, Canal Zone. Personnel were reassigned to the 1st and 4th Coast Artillery (HD) Regiments. At this time the two Harbor Defense regiments became “mixed” AA and HD regiments.

1938 - 1 June - Activated at Fort Winfield Scott, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “A”, 65th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1943 - 12 July - Departed San Francisco

1943 - 22 July - Arrived in Alaska

1943 - 30 August - Arrived on Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1944 - 29 February - 65th AAA Group inactivated, Adak, Alaska.

1949 - 1 May - Activated on Okinawa

1953 - 23 February - Redesignated as Battery “A”, 65th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion.

1958 - 1 September - Reorganized and redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 1st Gun Battalion, 65th Artillery

1958 - 1 October - Consolidated with Battery “B”, 49th AA Missile Battalion.

1959 - 25 March - Reorganized and Redesignated as 1st Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

Nike Hercules in Okinawa - Part of the 30th Brigade / Okinawa

“A” Battery, 1st Battalion, 65th Artillery - Site #5 - Located at MCAF - Marine Corp Air Facility.

“B” Battery, 1st Battalion, 65th Artillery - Site #6 - Located in Chinen adjacent to site #14 (Hawk)

“C” Battery, 1st Battalion, 65th Artillery - Site #7 - Located in Yozadaki, also HQ for the 1st / 65th.

Amenities included a swimming pool, tennis courts, baseball field with night lights and cement block dugouts, several generator buildings, EM club, Mess Hall, Barracks, Administration building and an underground communication center.

“D” Battery, 1st Battalion, 65th Artillery - Site #8 - Located at Naha AFB, also location of AADCP.

1968 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1970 - 1 May - Inactivated on Okinawa.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery.

1972 - 13 September - Activated at Key West, Florida .

1972 - 13 September - Assumes operational status at all Hawk sites formerly occupied by 6th Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery in Key West, Florida.

1979 - June - Key West Hawk operations cease and the unit is moved to Fort Bliss.

1979 - 1st Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery is assigned to the 11th ADA Brigade at Fort Bliss. and is eventually inactivated in 1988.

1988 - 1st Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery is inactivated. The unit is reflagged as the 3rd Battalion, 1st Air Defense Artillery and moved to Fort Hood and placed under 31st ADA Brigade..

2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery

1901 - 28 February - Constituted in the Regular Army as the 87th Company, Coast Artillery, Artillery Corps.

1901 - Organized at Fort Slocum, New York, stationed at Fort Totten, in Eastern New York

1907 - 2 February - Redesignated as the 87th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1916 - July - Redesignated as the 2nd Company, Fort Grant, Canal Zone.

1917 - 31 August - Redesignated as the 2nd Company, Coast Defenses of Balboa.

1922 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 87th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1924 - 1 July - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “B”, 65th Coast Artillery.

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General.

1929 - September - The 2nd Battalion, 65th CA (AA) Regiment consisting of Batteries C, D, and E, was posted at Forts Randolph and Sherman in 1929. The battalion had completed a very satisfactory machine gun target practice season, it was fully expected that the 2nd Battalion would again receive the Department Machinegun trophy.

HQ, A & B Battery, Coastal defense of Balboa, Fort Amador, Canal Zone

1932 - 15 April - Inactivated at Fort Amador, Canal Zone. Personnel were reassigned to the 1st and 4th Coast Artillery (HD) Regiments. At this time the two Harbor Defense regiments became “mixed” AA and HD regiments.

1939 - 11 October - 2nd Battalion activated at Fort Winfield Scott, California.

1939 - 12 October - 2nd Battalion assigned to Fort Barry, California.

Note: In 1957, Fort Barry became the site of a Nike Hercules missile site known as SF-88. It is currently part of the Golden Gate Recreation Area. When the 2nd Battalion, 51st Artillery was inactivated in 1971, and the Army abandoned the site, two non-operative Nike Hercules missiles were left in the underground storage area. The launch area is currently protected, preserved, well maintained and is an interpretive center. Nike missile demonstrations are given once a month.

1941 - January 6 - 2nd Battalion moves from Fort Barry to the Anti Aircraft Artillery Training Center at Camp Haan in Riverside, California for intensive AAA training.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “B”, 65th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1943 - July 12 - Departed San Francisco.

1943 - July 22 - Arrived in Alaska.

1944 - December 6 - Departed Alaska.

1944 - December 16 - Arrived in Seattle.

1945 - 1 May - Reorganized and redesignated as the 427th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battery.

1945 - 4 December - Inactivated at Fort Lawton, Washington.

1946 - 3 October - Redesignated as the 427th Antiaircraft Artillery Searchlight Battery.

1946 - 1 November - Activated a Camp Hood, Texas.

1948 - 27 December - Inactivated at Camp Hood, Texas.

1954 - 28 December - Redesignated as the 427th Antiaircraft Artillery Battery.

1955 - 1 January - Activated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

Attached to 508th Airborne Regimental Combat Team

1957 - 22 March - Inactivated at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

1958 - 12 August - Redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 2nd Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1958 - 1 September - Battalion activated at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.

ARADCOM New York defenses - Sites manned by 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery / Nike Ajax & Hercules.

NY-80R - Morristown, NJ - “HQ” Battery (Radar Section), 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery - Used an AN/FPS-36 Surveillance Radar to extend radar coverage of the NY metro defense area. The unit reported to Fort Wadsworth. The operation became obsolete with the activation of the Missile Master facility at Highlands, NJ.

NY-73 - Summit, NJ - “A” Battery, 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery - 1958 - 1959 - 30 Nike Ajax.

NY-65 - South Plainfield, NJ - “B” Battery, 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery - 1958 - 1960 - 20 Nike Ajax & 12 Nike Hercules.

NY-79/80 - Livingston / East Hanover, NJ - “C” Battery, 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery - 1958 - 1960 - 60 Nike Ajax & 18 Nike Hercules.

NY-88 - Wayne, NJ - 1958 - 1959 - “D” Battery, 2nd Battalion, 65th Artillery - 30 Nike Ajax.

1960 - 26 July - Battalion inactivated at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 2nd Missile Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery.

1972 - 13 September - Redesignated as the 2nd Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery, and activated at Van Nuys, California.

1974 - 30 September - Inactivated at Van Nuys, California

3rd Battalion, 65th Artillery

1901 - 7 October - Constituted in the Regular Army as the 124th Company, Coast Artillery, Artillery Corps.

1901 - 15 October - Organized at Fort Wadsworth, New York, stationed at Fort Andrews, Boston

1907 - 2 February - Redesignated as the 124th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1916 - July - Redesignated as the 2nd Company, Fort Sherman, Canal Zone.

1917 - 31 August - Redesignated as the 2nd Company, Coast Defenses of Cristobal.

1922 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 124th Company, coast Artillery Corps.

1924 - 1 July - Consolidated with Battery “D”, 65th Artillery, Coast Artillery corps. Consolidated and reorganized unit redesignated as Battery “D”, 65th Coast Artillery.

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General

Btry D - Coastal Defense of Cristobal, HQ at Fort Sherman, CZ

1932 - 15 April - Inactivated at Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.

1939 - 11 October - Activated at Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “D”, 65th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1943 - July 12 - Departed San Francisco.

1943 - July 22 - Arrived in Alaska.

1943 - 30 August - Arrived Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1943 - 25 December - Departed Kiska, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1943 - 31 December - Arrived Fort Greely, Alaska.

1944 - 21 June - Departed Fort Greely, Alaska.

1944 - 24 June - Arrived Adak, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1944 - 18 August - Reorganized as a type “A” unit.

1945 - 1 May - Reorganized and redesignated as the 429th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battery.

1945 - 30 October - 429th AAA transferred to Fort Lewis, Washington.

1945 - 30 November - Inactivated at Fort Lewis Washington.

1953 - 6 May - Redesignated as the 429th Antiaircraft Artillery Battery.

1953 - 8 June - Activated at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1953 - 27 August - 429th AAA Btry to Thule, Greenland.  Attached to 549th AAA Bn.

Used 75mm guns.

1958 - 15 May - Inactivated at Thule, Greenland.

Inactivated after four Nike Hercules sites were constructed in 1957-58. Nike unit was 4th Battalion, 55th Artillery and part of ARADCOM.

4th Battalion, 55th Artillery inactivated 20 December, 1960. ARADCOM / Nike operations ceased in May, 1965.

1958 - 12 August - Redesignated and Constituted as HQ & HQ Battery, 3rd Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1958 - 1 September - Battalion activated at Cleveland, Ohio.

ARADCOM Detroit / Cleveland Defense / Nike Ajax & Hercules

Site D-34DC - Warrensville - 1959 - June 1971 - HHB 3rd Bn, 65th Artillery.

Site CL-34 - Warrensville - Sept. 1958 - Jan. 1961 - Battery B, 3rd Bn, 65th Artillery - 30 Ajax.

Site CL-02 - Bratenahl - Sept. 1958 - 1959 - HHB 65th Artillery - 18 Hercules.

Site CL-11 - Painesville - Sept. 1958 - June 1971 - Battery A, 3rd Bn, 65th Artillery - 18 Hercules.

Site CL-13 - Willowick - Sept. 1958 - June 1961 - Battery C, 3rd Bn, 65th Artillery - 30 Ajax.

Site CL-69 - Lordstown - Aug. 1961 - Feb. 1963 - Battery C, 3rd Bn, 65th Artillery - 18 Hercules.

1965 - 20 December - Redesignated as the 3rd Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1971 - 30 June - Battalion inactivated at Cleveland, Ohio.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 3rd Battalion, 65th air Defense Artillery.

4th Battalion, 65th Artillery

1901 - 28 February - Constituted in the Regular Army as the 89th Company, Coast Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps.

1901 - 5 April - Organized at Fort Banks, Massachusetts.

1907 - 2 February - Redesignated as the 89th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1916 - July - Redesignated as the 4th Company, Fort Williams, Cape Elizabeth, Portland, Maine.

1917 - 21 July - Reorganized and Redesignated as Battery “F”, 6th Provisional Regiment, Coast Artillery Corps.

1918 - 5 February - Redesignated as Battery “C” , 51st Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps.


1918 - 7 August - Redesignated Battery “C”, 57th Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps.

1921 - 30 June - Demobilized at Camp Lewis, Washington.

1922 - 1 June - Reconstituted in the Regular Army and consolidated with the 3rd Company, Coast Defenses of San Diego, Fort Rosecrans, California. Consolidated and reorganized unit then redesignated as the 89th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1924 - 1 July - 89th Company, CAC, consolidated with Battery “F”, 65th Artillery, Coast Artillery Corps. Consolidated unit redesignated Battery “F”, 65th Coast Artillery and inactivated at San Diego, California.

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General

1926 - 31 July - Activated at Fort Randolph, CanalZone.

Btry C, Coastal Defenses of Cristobal, HQ at Fort Randolph

1932 - 15 April - Inactivated at Fort Amador, Canal Zone.

1939 - 11 October - Activated a Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “B”, 255th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion.

1943 - 26 July - Departed San Francisco for overseas service.

1943 - 15 August - Arrived on Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1944 - 4 April - Relocated to Adak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1944 - 22 November - Relocated to Attu Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1945 - 3 February - Disbanded at Camp Earle, Attu Island, Alaska.

1950 - 28 June - Reconstituted in the Regular Army and consolidated with Battery “B”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion. Consolidated unit designated Battery “B”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1953 - 15 March - Activated in Germany. Kleber Kaserne, Kaiserslautern, Germany.

1953 - 1 October - Redesignated as Battery “B”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion.

1958 - 10 April - Inactivated in Germany.

1958 - 12 August - Redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 4th Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1958 - 1 September - Battalion activated at Los Angeles, California.

12th Artillery Group, Pasadena, California.

ARADCOM Los Angeles defense / Nike Hercules

LA - 78 - Malibu - “B” Battery, 4th Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.


LA - 88 - Chatsworth - “C” Battery, 4th Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

LA - 96 - Van Nuys - “D” Battery, 4th Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery. (ex-551st AAA / 90mm)

1965 - 20 December - Redesignated as the 4th Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 4th Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery.

1972 - 13 September - Inactivated at Van Nuys, California

6th Battalion, 65th Artillery

1917 - 1 June - Organized in the Regular Army at Fort Grant, Canal Zone, as the 7th Company, Fort Grant, Canal Zone.

1917 - 31 August - Redesignated as the 7th Company, Coast Defenses of Balboa.

1922 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 195th Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1924 - 1 July - Consolidated with Battery “E”, 65th Artillery, CAC, consolidated unit redesignated as Battery “E”, 65th Coast Artillery and inactivated.

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General

1926 - 31 July - Activated at Fort Randolph, Canal Zone.


1932 - 15 April - Inactivated at Fort Amador, Canal Zone.

1938 - 1 June - Activated at Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and Redesignated as Battery “A”, 255th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion.

1943 - 26 July - Departed San Francisco for overseas service.

1943 - 15 August - Arrived on Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1944 - 4 April - Relocated to Adak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1944 - 22 November - Relocated to Attu Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1945 - 3 February - Disbanded at Camp Earle, Attu Island, Alaska.

1945 - 3 February - Disbanded at Camp Earle, Alaska.

Samuel Nowlin of Btry “A”, 255th AAA AW Battalion died on Attu and
is buried in the military cemetery there. The Army base on Attu was named Camp Earle and this is where the 255th AAA was disbanded in late 1944.

1950 - 28 June - Reconstituted in the Regular Army and consolidated with Battery “A”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion. Consolidated unit designated Battery “A”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1953 - 15 March - Activated in Germany. Rhine Kaserne, Wiesbaden, Germany.

1953 - 1 October - Redesignated as Battery “A”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion.

1958 - 10 April - Inactivated in Germany.

1959 - 31 July - Redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 6th Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1961 - 11 October - Redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 6th Missile Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1961 - 22 December - Battalion activated at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1961 - Moved to Fort Meade, Maryland but remained at non operational status due to NSA proximity.

1962 - October - Battalion moves from Fort Meade to temporary sites in Key West, Florida area during Cuban Missile Crisis. HQ & HQ Battery billeted in Casa Marina Hotel.

ARADCOM Key West Defense / Hawk

“A” 6th / 65th - KW-80 - North end of Fleming Key

“B” 6th / 65th - KW-65 - Monroe County Beach and north side of Atlantic Boulevard at White Street. Permanent site - Key West Airport, north side of runway.

“C” 6th / 65th - KW-24 - NAS Boca Chica, later Bay Point, Saddlebunch Key. Permanent site, Geiger Key, south of Old Boca Chica Road / SR-4A

“D” 6th / 65th - KW-10 - Battery Osceola and Battery Adair at Fort Taylor as well as Taylor Beach at Naval Base. Permanent site, Boca Chica Key north of US-1

“HQ” 6th / 65th AADCP - KW-18 DC - Bertha Street at South Roosevelt Blvd.

ADCOM - NORAD - Z-209 - NCC at NAS, Boca Chica Key, south of US-1

1965 - 20 December - Redesignated as the 6th Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1966 - January - All firing batteries have moved into permanent sites and all battalion personnel move into building B-727, NAS Boca Chica.

1966 - AADCP moves from Bertha Street, Key West to NORAD Control Center, NAS Boca Chica.

Note: The initial deployment to Key West and set up at temporary sites was completed Oct. 29, 1962. Thereafter, it was decided that the battalion would stay in Key West and that permanent sites for each battery would be built. It was determined that the temporary locations for the equipment was decided upon hurriedly and in some cases incorrectly. Some equipment was relocated not once but several times until a good temporary location was finally agreed upon.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 6th Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery.

1972 - 13 September - Inactivated at Key West, Florida.

1972 - 13 September - Operational responsibilities assumed by 1st Battalion, 65th Air Defense Artillery until June 1979.

Battery “G“ (7th Bn), 65th Artillery

1917 - 1 June - Organized in the Regular Army at Fort de Lesseps, Canal Zone, as the 1st Company, Fort de Lesseps, Canal Zone.

1917 - 31 August - Redesignated as the 6th Company, Coast Defense of Cristobal.

1921 - 15 September - Inactivated at Fort de Lesseps, Canal Zone.

1922 - 30 June - Redesignated as the 193rd Company, Coast Artillery Corps.

1924 - 1 July - Redesignated as Battery “G”, 65th Coast Artillery.

1925 - 21 September - The Ocelot Distinctive Insignia is approved for use by the Quartermaster General

1939 - 11 October - Activated at Fort Winfield Scott, San Francisco.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated a Battery “C”, 255th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion.

1943 - 26 July - Departed San Francisco for overseas service.

1943 - 15 August - Arrived on Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

1944 - 4 April - Relocated to Adak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1944 - 22 November - Relocated to Attu Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

1945 - 3 February - Disbanded at Camp Earle, Attu Island, Alaska.

1950 - 28 June - Reconstituted in the Regular Army and consolidated with Battery “C”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion, consolidated unit designated as, Battery “C”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion.

1953 - 15 March - Activated in Germany.

1953 - 1 October - Redesignated as Battery “C”, 40th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion.

1958 - 10 April - Inactivated in Germany.

1959 - 31 July - Redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 7th Battalion, 65th Artillery.

1965 - 30 December - Redesignated as Battery “G”, 65th Artillery.

1966 - March 1 - Activated at Fort Bliss, Texas.

1966 - 6 November - Unit arrives at Qui Nhon, Republic of Viet Nam

G Btry, 65th Arty, was a Quad 50 Battery

Assigned to the 108th Artillery Group

Attached to 1st Bn, 44th Arty out of Dong Ha on the DMZ.

Participated in the following actions:

Counteroffensive, Phase 2

Counteroffensive, Phase 3

TET 1968 Counteroffensive

Counteroffensive, Phase 4

Counteroffensive, Phase 5

Counteroffensive, Phase 6

TET 1969 Counteroffensive

Summer - Fall 1969

Winter - Spring 1970

Sanctuary Counteroffensive

Counteroffensive, Phase 7

Consolidation 1

Consolidation 2


Received the following Citations:

Presidential Unit Citation - Viet Nam - 1966 - 1967

Valorous Unit Award - Quang Tri-Thua Thien 1968

Valorous Unit Award - Quang Tri Province 1970

Republic of Viet Nam Cross of Gallantry with Palm 1974

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as Battery “G”, 65th Air Defense Artillery.

1971 - 6 November - Unit stood down at Red Beach, Da Nang, five years to the day that it rolled ashore at Qui Nhon on November 6, 1966.

1971 - 26 December - Inactivated in Viet Nam.

“G” Battery, 65th ADA had an assigned strength of between 114 and 142 men. Being in RVN just over 5 years and allowing for rotations and re-assignments, there were possibly between 600 - 900 men who served in the unit.

Detachment 12, 65th Artillery

1929 - 22 April - Constituted in the Regular Army as Battery “I”, 65th Coast Artillery.

1942 - 15 June - Activated at Inglewood, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as Battery “I”, 245th Antiaircraft Artillery Searchlight Battalion, Inglewood, California.

1944 - 12 June - Inactivated at Camp Haan, California.

1944 - 26 June - Disbanded

1959 - 30 April - Reconstituted in the Army Reserve and redesignated as the 12th Detachment, 65th Artillery, and assigned to the Second United States Army.

1959 - 1 June - Activated at Clarion, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania Army Reserve

1963 - 11 February - Inactivated at Clarion, Pennsylvania.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 12th Detachment, 65th ADA

Detachment 16, 65th Artillery

1942 - 27 May - Constituted in the Regular Army as HQ & HQ Battery, 3rd Battalion, 65th Coast Artillery.

1942 - 15 June - Activated at Inglewood, California.

1943 - 10 May - Reorganized and redesignated as HQ & HQ Battery, 245th Antiaircraft Artillery Searchlight Battalion, Inglewood, California.

1944 - 12 June - Inactivated at Camp Haan, California.

1944 - 26 June - Disbanded

1958 - 5 August - Reconstituted in the Regular Army and redesignated as the 16th Detachment, 65th Artillery.

1958 - 1 September - Activated at Camp Irwin, California. California National Guard.

1962 - 2 July - Inactivated at Camp Irwin, California.

1971 - 1 September - Redesignated as the 16th Detachment, 65th Air Defense Artillery.
 
Note: The information on the history of the 65th Artillery is based on information available to the author at the time the research was done. The author thanks noted military historian William C. Gaines for his immense contribution in compiling the above facts. The information above is as of July 27, 2005 and will be updated with more information on Panama in the near future as well as other information as it becomes available. Any corrections or additional information is welcome. Click HERE to email author.